Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

March & April 2021

The Club still remains closed at present but hopefully we will soon find out when and how the lockdown is going to be released so that we can all return to something that seems nearly normal.

Things to do in the garden in March.

  • Shallots and Onion sets should be planted this month and if it is mild Early Potatoes can be planted towards the end of the month.

Most vegetable seed can now be sown outdoors if it is mild in prepared beds.

  • Most vegetable seed can now be sown outdoors if it is mild in prepared beds.
  • If you did not do so last month you can still sow Aubergines, Cucumbers, Sweet Peppers and Tomatoes in a heated propagator or indoors.

When conditions are dry the lawn should be cut with the mower blades on a high setting for the first few cuts…

  • Cut back last years Autumn fruiting Raspberry canes to ground level, prune Blueberries and Gooseberries and apply a dressing of a balanced fertiliser or Sulphate of Potash at 15g per sq m.
  • Bush and Standard Roses should be pruned and fed with a Rose Fertiliser.
  • Continue to prune Summer Flowering Shrubs and Dogwoods.
  • When conditions are dry the lawn should be cut with the mower blades on a high setting for the first few cuts, Weed and Feed with Mosskiller should be applied just before rain is forecast.

Things to do in the garden in April.

  • Second Early Potatoes should be planted in the first half of the month, Maincrop Potatoes can be planted in the second half.
  • Beetroot, Carrots, Leeks, Lettuce, Radish, Spring Onions and Turnip can all be sown outdoors now.
  • Brassicas should be sown in small pots ready for transplanting later in the Summer.
  • Plant out Broad Beans which were sown indoors.
  • Tomato seedlings which have developed their first true leaves should be potted up. Plant Summer flowering bulbs such as Gladioli.

Plant out Broad Beans which were sown indoors.

  • Tulip flowers leaving the foliage to die back.
  • Deadhead Pansy and other Spring bedding plants to encourage continuous
  • flowering. Prune Forsythia immediately after flowering.
  • Cut back Lavender to keep the plant bushy but do not cut into
  • old wood.

Continue to apply Lawn Weed and Feed with Mosskiller as necessary.

  • In the Greenhouse sow bedding plants such as French Marigold for a Summer display.
  • Continue to apply Lawn Weed and Feed with Mosskiller as necessary.
  • Start checking for and controlling Slugs, Snails and Aphids.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

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Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

January & February 2021

The Club still remains closed at present, hopefully we can open in the Spring when we might have come out of the tiers and life has returned to normal whatever that may be.

I wish you all a successful year in your garden and that you will grow plenty of entries for our shows.

Things to do in the garden in January.

  • If you cannot garden because the soil is rain sodden or frosted you can use your time by studying plant catalogues which have arrived in the post on a regular basis.
  • The same advice applies as when ordering spring flowering bulbs, the larger the plants you buy the better they will be when planted out in May. If you only need a few plants it would probably be better to visit a local nursery, such as Elm Nursery at Sutton Green, in May where you can select your plants first hand.

…remember that this year’s novelty seeds are likely to be next year’s ordinary seeds.

  • New seed varieties which are usually F1 Hybrids are expensive to buy and often difficult to germinate, so look on the back of the packet to see how many seeds you are buying for your money, remember that this year’s novelty seeds are likely to be next year’s ordinary seeds.
  • Whilst the fruit buds are still dormant Apple and Pear trees can be pruned, cut out any congested growth to increase airflow which will improve the quality of next seasons fruit, cut back to a fruit bud which is large and rounded on older growth, one year old shoots should be pruned back to a slender bud.

Things to do in the garden in February.

  • Plunge shrivelled Dahlia tubers into a bucket of tepid water overnight, having removed any rotten tubers, they can then be started into growth to provide cuttings for new plants, place the tubers in a seed tray or pot and lightly cover with damp soil.
  • Slow germinating annuals such as Antirrhinum and Lobelia should be sown indoors.
  • Prune Summer flowering deciduous shrubs such as Buddleia which flower on the current year’s growth. Cut back Summer and Autumn flowering Clematis to the lowest pair of strong buds.
  • Sow Sweet Peas and pot on those sown in the Autumn.
  • When it is mild Broad Beans, Carrots and Parsnips can be sown under cloches.

When it is mild Broad Beans, Carrots and Parsnips can be sown under cloches.

  • Sow Greenhouse Tomatoes, Cucumbers and Peppers at 21°C.
  • Seed Potatoes should be placed on their ends in a light, cool, frost free place to sprout.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

November & December 2020

Please note that all Club meetings remain cancelled until further notice due to the Covid-19 virus and the Rule of Six.

The Trading Hut remains closed. If there is anything that you need please call 01483 874123.

Things to do in the garden in November.

  • Planting of Tulips should be completed by the end of this month.
  • Cut down faded perennials leaving Penstemon and other late flowering perennials to continue flowering.
  • Dahlias and Cannas should be lifted, dried and stored in a frost free place ready for planting next Spring, if they are being overwintered in the ground they should be covered with a mulch dressing.
  • Apply an application of a mulch dressing to protect Agapanthus from the frost.

Reduce the watering of houseplants.

  • Half hardy Fuchsias and Pelargoniums should be cut back and brought undercover, reduce watering so that they remain dormant during the winter months.
  • Amaryllis bulbs should be potted up for Christmas flowering.
  • Bring potted Hyacinths into a light cool area once they begin to shoot.
  • Reduce the watering of Houseplants.
  • Now is a good time to plant Raspberry Canes, Fruit Trees and Bushes.
  • Start the winter pruning of Apple and Pear trees.
  • Aquadulce Broad Beans should be planted now to produce an early crop ahead of the Spring invasion of Blackfly.
  • Garlic cloves can still be planted.
  • Continue to rake leaves off of the lawn.

Things to do in the garden in December.

  • Indoor Azaleas should be watered frequently to prevent the dense root ball from drying out, rainwater is better than tap water.
  • Poinsettias are a popular gift at this time of the year, they should be kept in a warm light place away from draughts, they do not like to be over watered. All other Houseplants should be kept in a bright place as winter light levels fall, on frosty nights do not leave them trapped between closed curtains and the window.
  • Pinch out the tips of Sweet Peas sown in October to encourage bushy growth.

Poinsettias are a popular gift at this time of the year, they should be kept in a warm light place away from draughts, they do not like to be over watered.

  • The vegetable plot should be cleared of all left over plant debris and lightly dug over to open up the ground so that the winter frost can get in and destroy bugs and diseases.
  • Rhubarb crowns can be forced by covering them with dark bucket.

Keep off of the lawn when it is frosty or very wet.

  • Grape vines should be pruned before Christmas to prevent bleeding.
  • Keep off of the Lawn when it is frosty or very wet.
  • Insulate garden taps and exposed pipe work against extreme weather.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

September & October 2020

Please note that the Autumn Show has been cancelled although Club meetings will restart in October.

We intend to restart our monthly talks on Tuesday 27th October at 7.30pm in the Village Hall when Nigel Choat will be taking us on a trip along the ‘Wey side and woodlands’. Subscriptions which we were unable to collect in April will now be collected in September at the reduced rate of £2.00 per household to allow for the missed meetings during the Lockdown. The Trading Hut remains closed, if there is anything that you require please call 01483 874123.

Things to do in the garden in September.

  • Enjoy your garden whilst it is still at its best but as the evenings are drawing in we should be on the lookout for a frost by the end of this month in the weather forecast.
  • On sunny days continue to collect the seed of Annuals, except F1 Hybrids, for sowing next Spring.
  • Cuttings can still be taken from tender perennials such as Fuchsia and Pelargonium.
  • Evergreen hedges should be given a final trim for the year.
  • Daffodils and Narcissi should be planted this month for a good Spring display. Remember that the bigger the bulb the larger the flower.
  • Keep Camellias and Rhododendrons well watered to ensure that there is good bud formation for flowering next Spring.

Enjoy your garden whilst it is still at its best but as the evenings are drawing in we should be on the lookout for a frost.

  • A late sowing of Turnip and Spinach can still be made.
  • Plant out over wintering Onion sets and Spring Cabbage.
  • Harvest Main Crop Potatoes and Sweetcorn, continue to pick Runner Beans and Courgettes.
  • Cut out fruited canes of Raspberry and Loganberry.

Things to do in the garden in October.

  • At the first sign of frost all tender plants should be brought inside and kept in a frost free place.
  • Cut back and divide Herbaceous Perennials, once Dahlias have had their leaves blackened by frost they should be lifted, dried off and stored in a frost free place.
  • Spring Bedding plants can now be planted out.
  • Climbing and tall Rose bushes can now be pruned to minimise damage from wind rock.
  • Tulip bulbs should be ordered or purchased for planting in November.
  • Towards the end of the month Sweet Peas can be sown under glass.
  • Now is the time to plant up pots of Hyacinth and ‘Paperwhite’ Narcissi for a Christmas display, keeping the bulbs in a cool dark place until they begin to sprout. To flower together Hyacinth bulbs all need to be the same colour.
  • Garlic cloves can be planted this month just below the surface of the soil 15cm apart with the tip of the clove upright.

Now is the time to plant up pots of Hyacinth and ‘Paperwhite’ Narcissi for a Christmas display.

  • Rhubarb crowns can be lifted and divided.
  • Now is a good time to plant hedges and trees.
  • The lawn should be scarified and then a Autumn dressing applied just before rain is forecast, this is an ideal time to lay turf and to reseed the lawn.
  • The watering of Houseplants should be reduced as the days shorten.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

July & August 2020

Please note that all Club meetings are cancelled until further notice due to the Covid-19 virus.

The Summer Show has had to be postponed until next year. The Trading Hut remains closed. If there is anything that you need please call 01483 874123.

Things to do in the garden in July.

  • Remove the main stem of Cordon Tomatoes just above the fourth truss, any fruit that forms above this truss is unlikely to ripen before winter sets in.
  • Spray Potatoes and Tomatoes when it is wet and muggy to reduce the risk of blight damage.

Regularly pick Courgettes unless you wish the fruit to become Marrows.

  • A regular feed of Tomorite will help Tomatoes and Dahlias to produce good fruit and flowers, start feeding Tomatoes as soon as the first fruit starts to form, irregular watering will encourage blossom end rot in Tomatoes.
  • Continue to make successional sowings of Salad Crops
  • Regularly pick Courgettes unless you wish the fruit to become Marrows.
  • French and Runner Beans will become tough and stringy unless they are picked frequently.
  • Leeks and Winter Brassicas should be planted out this month.
  • Give Summer Bedding Plants and containerised plants a regular Liquid feed.
  • Dead head Bedding Plants to maintain a colourful display and Perennials to obtain a second flush of bloom.
  • Keep containerised Camellias and Rhododendrons well watered to enable good flowering next year.

Things to do in the garden in August.

  • After all your hard work during the ‘Lockdown’ you can now sit back and enjoy the fruits of your labour.
  • Continue to harvest fast growing Vegetables and Salad crops as they mature.
  • Keep Runner Beans well watered which will help the flowers to set.
  • Rambling Roses should be pruned after flowering, cutting out one in three stems from the base to encourage new growth.
  • Summer prune Wisteria, removing all new shoots to five buds above the main stem.
  • Now is the time to set Earwig traps amongst your Dahlias, fill a 3” pot with hay or straw and place it upside down on the end of the cane supporting the plant, the Earwigs will climb into the pot during the night and will be waiting for you to shake them out into a dish in the morning for disposal.

After all your hard work during the ‘Lockdown’ you can now sit back and enjoy the fruits of your labour.

  • This month you can start collecting seed from Annuals ready for sowing next Spring, do not collect the seed of F1 hybrids as they will not produce flowers true to type next year.
  • Set the mower blades on high when cutting the grass during dry periods.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

May & June 2020

Please note that all Club meetings are cancelled until further notice due to the Covid-19 virus. I hope that you all stay well and I look forward to seeing you at future meetings and events.

One of the best places to self isolate is in your garden (weather permitting), gardening is very good for your mental and physical wellbeing and as it is right on your doorstep it can easily become part of your daily physical exercise with an added bonus of producing fruit, vegetables and flowers for you to enjoy.

Things to do in the garden in May.

  • Continue to make successional sowings of Salad Crops.
  • French and Runner Beans can now be sown outdoors.
  • There is still time to sow Courgettes and Squash in pots for planting out later, remember always to sow the seed standing on edge to aid germination.
  • Kale, Leeks and Purple Sprouting should be sown now for harvesting during the Winter months.
  • Brussel Sprouts and Tomatoes should be planted towards the end of the month after the risk of a frost has past, start removing side shoots from Tomatoes except for Bush varieties.
  • Spray Roses regularly with a systemic insecticide to control Blackspot and Greenfly.
  • Sweet Peas need to be tied to supports as they grow.
  • Towards the end of the month plant out young Dahlia plants and tubers.

One of the best places to self isolate is in your garden, gardening is very good for your mental and physical wellbeing and as it is right on your doorstep…

  • A Spring and Summer dressing should be applied to lawns when rain is forecast.
  • The RHS are now asking you to allow flowers to grow on your lawns instead of insisting on a smooth green surface, so that you can help to replace 7.5 million acres of wildflowers lost in this country since the Thirties and support bees, butterflies and other pollinators looking for nectar.

Things to do in the garden in June.

  • Harvest Salad crops as they mature.
  • When Early Potatoes come into flower they are ready to be dug.
  • Sow French and Runner Beans for a late crop.
  • Plant out Courgettes, Squash.
  • Fast growing Annuals such as Calendula can be sown where they are to grow.
  • Complete the planting of Summer Bedding Plants Cannas, Dahlias and Gladioli.
  • Dead head Delphiniums and Lupins to encourage a second flush.
  • Pinch out the leading shoots of Chrysanthemum, Helianthus and Fuchsia to encourage a bushy growth.
  • Spring flowering shrubs such as Forsythia and Philadelphus should be pruned but leave Magnolias until they are in full leaf.
  • The planting out of Containers and Tubs should be completed.
  • Make sure that newly planted trees and shrubs are well watered during dry weather.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

March & April 2020

Dates for your diary, The Trading Hut re-opens on Sunday 1st March at 10.30am. Tuesday 24th March is the AGM after which John Negus will be talking on the ‘Plants and Flowers of Disneyland Florida’. At the AGM we will need to elect a new Committee, we urgently need a Secretary, if you think that you can assist in filling that post or by being a Committee Member then please come along and support us and your Club. 28th April Geoff Peach will be talking on a Gardeners Life.

Things to do in the garden in March.

  • Shallots and Onion Sets should be planted this month and if the weather continues to be mild Early Potatoes can be planted towards the end of the month.
  • Most vegetable crops can be sown this month, Sweet Peppers, Tomatoes, Cucumbers and Aubergines can sown in a frost free greenhouse or heated propagator.
  • Fruit trees and bushes should be fed with Sulphate of Potash – 15g per sq.metre.
  • Pruning of Blueberries, Gooseberries and Autumn fruiting Raspberries should be completed this month.
  • This is the last chance to prune established Bush and Standard Roses.
  • Sow hardy-annuals where they are to flower and to attract insects.
  • Take basal stem cuttings of Dahlias this month.

This month is a good time to move shrubs as they will re-establish themselves quickly in their new positions.

  • Continue to prune summer flowering shrubs such as Buddleia and Dogwoods which have been grown for their winter colour.
  • This month is a good time to move shrubs as they will re-establish themselves quickly in their new positions.
  • Apply ‘Weed & Feed’ with Mosskiller to the lawn then rake and scarify to remove the dead thatch, in mild conditions start to mow the grass with the mower blades on a high setting.

Things to do in the garden in April.

  • Second Early and Main crop potatoes should be planted.
  • Beetroot, Carrots, Lettuce, Leeks, Radish, Spring Onions and Turnip can all now be safely sown outdoors.
  • Plant out Broad Beans which have been sown indoors.
  • Tomato seedlings which have developed their first true leaves should be potted up.
  • Brassicas should be sown in small pots to be transplanted into their growing positions in the Summer.
  • Continue to make sowings of Annual Bedding Plants most of which can now be sown outdoors.
  • Regularly tie in Climbers such as HoneySuckle and Clematis.
  • Feed Roses with a Rose Fertiliser to encourage growth.
  • Prune evergreen shrubs such as Choisya and Ceanothus but leave the pruning of spring flowering shrubs until after
  • they have flowered.
  • Summer flowering Bulbs should be planted now.
  • Apply a general fertiliser such as Growmore or Fish, Blood and Bone to borders and beds.
  • Clear weeds before they become established.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

January & February 2020

Congratulations to Carol Bennett the winner of the Club’s 2019 Banksian Medal and to David and Pat Taylor of Farm Cott, Merrow Lane who have won the Deane Trophy for Best Kept Summer Front garden. We look forward to hearing Paul Patton’s talk on January 28th on Growing Vegetables for the Kitchen.

Things to do in the garden in January.

  • On a dry day lightly dig over the vegetable patch to let the frost in, well rotted manure or compost should then be dug into the soil and left until the plot is ready to be cultivated.
  • Apple and Pear trees can now be pruned, on older mature trees congested growth should be cut away to increase airflow thus improving the quality of next seasons fruit, cut back to a fruit bud which is large and rounded to encourage the formation of fruiting branches, one year old shoots should be pruned back to a slender growth bud. whilst the tree is dormant in can be sprayed with an oil based product to kill off overwintering Aphids, Scale Insects and Red Spider Mites.
  • We will all have received House Plants as gifts over the Christmas Period, Poinsettias need a minimum temperature of 16-19°C, Amarllis prefer to be slightly warmer and Azaleas like to be slightly cooler but you will be more likely to kill them by overwatering, the best rule to follow is only water when the pot feels light, the exception is the Azalea which has a very compact root system which dries out very quickly and needs to be kept watered preferably with rainwater.

On wet, cold and windy days the only enjoyable task is to look through the many catalogues which have been landing on the doormat recently

  • On wet, cold and windy days the only enjoyable task is to look through the many catalogues which have been landing on the doormat recently so that you can plan your displays for the forthcoming Summer.

Things to do in the garden in February.

  • In the middle of this month you can give your indoor Tomatoes and Cucumbers an early start by sowing the seed at 21°C.
  • If the weather is mild an early sowing of Broad Beans, Carrots, Beetroot, Parsnips and Peas can be made under cloches.
  • Early Potatoes should be chitted in a light, cool, frost free place.
  • Dahlias can now be started into growth in pots to provide cuttings for extra plants this coming Summer.
  • Sow Sweet Peas and pot on those sown in the Autumn.
  • Protect Lilies’, Delphiniums, Lupin, and Hosta shoots from slugs and snails.
  • Top dress flower beds and borders with a balanced dressing of a fertiliser such as Growmore.
  • Prune Mahonia after flowering to encourage branching.
  • Cut back Wisteria side shoots to two or three buds.
  • Cut back late Summer and Autumn flowering Clematis to the lowest of a pair of strong buds.
  • Deadhead Winter flowering Heathers once the flowers have faded with a pair of shears.
  • Scarify and spike the lawn when the grass is reasonably dry to improve drainage and growth.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

November & December 2019

Thank you to everyone who entered the Autumn Show, congratulations to all the prize winners, especially Morriss Kemp, winner of the Martin Trophy, Carol Bennett winner of the Newman Trophy and I was lucky enough to retain the Ron Sporle Shield.

Andrew Halstead will again be at the meeting on November 28th to present a talk on ‘Bugs that Bite Back’ and to present the Club Trophies.

The Trading Hut will close on October 13th for the Winter months.

Things to do in the garden in November.

  • Tulip Bulbs should be planted this month.
  • Faded Perennials should be cut down leaving Penstemons and other late flowering plants to continue in bloom until caught by the frost.
  • An application of mulch should be applied to Agapanthus and Cannas to protect them from extreme cold.
  • Amaryllis bulbs should be planted in pots for a Christmas display.
  • Bring potted Hyacinths and Narcissi into a light cool place once they begin to shoot.
  • If you intend to overwinter half hardy Fuchsias and Pelargoniums they should be cut back and left dormant under cover in a frost free place until next Spring.
  • Start the Winter pruning of Apples and Pears.
  • Bush, Cane and Fruit trees can be planted this month.
  • Aquadulce Broad Beans should be sown this month in the hope of an early crop next year ahead of the Black fly invasion.
  • Regularly rake the fallen leaves off of the lawn and try to keep off of the grass during wet or frosty weather.

Things to do in the garden in December.

  • Clear left over plant debris from the vegetable plot leaving it ready for winter digging.

The most popular houseplant at this time of the year is the Poinsettia. To keep the plant at its best it should be kept in a warm light place away from draughts, do not over water.

  • For early Rhubarb force the crowns by covering them with a dark bucket.
  • Continue to prune Apple and Pear trees, Currants, Gooseberries can also be pruned.
  • Grape Vines, Acers and Birches should be pruned before Christmas to prevent bleeding.
  • Most deciduous trees and shrubs can now be cut back, leave Prunus species until they are in leaf next Spring and Magnolias should be left until next Summer before being cut back.
  • Now is a good time to plant Fruit trees and bushes, hedging, deciduous trees and shrubs.
  • Pinch out the tips of October sown Sweet Peas to encourage a bushy growth.
  • Indoor Azaleas should be watered regularly with rainwater to prevent the dense rootball from drying out.
  • Keep houseplants on a sunny windowsill as light levels fall and water less frequently.
  • The biggest killer of houseplants is over watering.
  • The most popular houseplant at this time of the year is the Poinsettia. To keep the plant at its best it should be kept in a warm light place away from draughts, do not over water.
  • Insulate garden taps and exposed pipework from extreme weather conditions.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

September & October 2019

Thank you to everyone who supported the Summer Show, congratulations to all the prize winners, especially Morriss Kemp, winner of the Ted Crump Rosebowl, the Howard Plate and the Ireland Trophy and Carol Bennett winner of the Teresa Hunt Trophy. Next year we must all make an effort to beat Morriss in the Rose and Sweet Pea classes. We look forward to receiving you’re entries for the Autumn Show on Saturday 7th September. Entries must be in by 11.00am, the show will reopen after judging at 2.30pm for refreshments and the presentation of prizes. Hopefully you will be one of the prize winners.

The Trading Hut will re-open on Sunday 1st September. The speaker at our meeting on October 22nd will be Mark Dobell who will be asking the question ‘Is the Squirrel a friend or a foe?’

Things to do in the garden in September.

  • The evenings are beginning to draw in and by the end of this month we can expect to see frosts, so enjoy your garden whilst it is still at its best.
  • On sunny days collect the seed of Annuals such as French Marigold and Tagetes for sowing next Spring, do not collect the seed of F1 Hybrids.
  • Cuttings of tender perennials such as Fuchsia and Pelargonium can still be taken.
  • Evergreen hedges should be given their final trim of the year.
  • Daffodils and Narcissi should be planted this month and next for a good display in the Spring.

The evenings are beginning to draw in and by the end of this month we can expect to see frosts, so enjoy your garden whilst it is still at its best.

  • Keep Camellias and Rhododendrons well watered to ensure good bud formation for next year.
  • Plant out overwintering Onion sets and Spring Cabbage plants.
  • Cut out the fruited canes from Raspberry and Loganberry.
  • Apply an Autumn dressing to the lawn just before rain is forecast.

Things to do in the garden in October.

  • All tender plants should be brought inside and kept in a frost free place.
  • Cut back and divide perennials which have become large clumps in the border.
  • Dahlias should be lifted once they have been blackened by the frost, the tubers should be dried off and kept in a frost free place ready for planting next Spring.
  • Prune climbing Roses and tall Bush Roses to minimise damage from windrock.
  • Tulips bulbs should be purchased or ordered for planting next month.
  • Sow Sweet Peas in pots towards the end of the month for over-wintering under glass.
  • Plant prepared Hyacinths and ‘Paperwhite’ Narcissi in pots for a Christmas display, keep the pots in a cool dark place until the bulbs begin to sprout and then bring them out into the light.
  • Remove the yellowing leaves of Brassicas to restrict grey mould.
  • Complete the lifting of Potatoes being careful to remove very small tubers which might carry disease into next years crop.
  • The lawn should scarified to remove the dead thatch which has accumulated during the summer, an Autumn dressing can still be applied when rain is forecast.
  • This is an ideal time to lay Turf and to reseed lawns.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123