Burpham Bowling Club redevelopment

The bowling green and Burpham Bowling Club clubhouse in Sutherland Memorial Park.

If you are a regular user of Sutherland Memorial Park, you may have noticed that M J Pryce builders have set up in the car park by the tennis courts. They are there to start work on a long planned refurbishment of the bowling clubhouse.

It is likely to take about three months and is the reason why the path along the front of the bowling club is now not accessible. Sorry about that!

The refurbishment is planned to make better use of the internal space of the clubhouse and provide a new, and more accessible, entrance. Burpham is a popular club with a good level of membership. In estate agents’ parlance the clubhouse is ‘compact’ so this project is intended to improve its internal space and accessibility.

We intend to make the clubhouse available for hire as a space more suited to local community groups looking for a cosier space, complementing the larger premises of the Memorial Hall close by.

The changes will enhance the clubhouse facilities, particularly for the club’s social side which continues throughout the winter. We intend to make the clubhouse available for hire as a space more suited to local community groups looking for a cosier space, complementing the larger premises of the Memorial Hall close by.

The club has very recently signed a new lease with Guildford Borough Council and the Council has agreed to provide a generous contribution to the costs of the refurbishment. We lost a number of grants when the fund raising activities of grant giving organisations were cancelled because of the Covid19 pandemic. Despite that setback the members rallied round and raised the (considerable) funds through their hard work and generosity, and the support of some local business sponsors.

The work is scheduled to finish in time for the start of the 2021 season in April.

The work is scheduled to finish in time for the start of the 2021 season in April. We will be arranging an official ‘re-opening’ of the club house and some celebratory events. We hope people will come and see the refurbished premises, relax by the green and try their hand at bowls. Great fun but, and like so many sports, more challenging than it looks. You’re never to young to start – Ed Morris, the current English men’s singles champion is just 32 – and we provide free coaching. You’ve just about got time to qualify for the 2022 Commonwealth Games!

Geoff Sheldon
Burpham Bowling Club Vice President

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Community Update January 2021

Sainsbury’s Loading Bay

We were delighted to hear that Sainsbury’s have withdrawn their application to extend their loading bay into The Copse, a designated Local Green Space.

They have announced that they will work with local groups on a revised proposal.

Parking in Bower’s Lane

If you are a regular visitor to the Riverside Park, you will be well aware of the parking problems. When the official car park is full, drivers park in Bower’s Lane, sometimes blocking drives and the slope up to Clay Lane.

There have been many occasions when vehicles have been unable to move in or out for some time. Such blockages also mean that emergency vehicles cannot get through, which could be disastrous for residents, anyone walking in the area or using the river. After some discussion with GBC, we are very pleased to tell you
that the Joint Committee has agreed to put double yellow lines at the top and bottom of the slope and
the stretch down to the river.

Telephone Coverage

It has been brought to the notice of the BCA that telephone coverage is not all that it might be, especially along the Wey Navigation towards Bowers Lock.

If you have noticed signals failing, we would appreciate it if you would let us have the location – a six figure grid reference would be ideal but as close as possible will do. We can then approach the providers and ask them to improve the signal in locations within the Ward.

If you have poor coverage outside the ward we can explain how you can get better coverage in that location by contacting your provider with certain information. Please contact the Secretary, details on next page.

To get in touch with the BCA: Contact the secretary on secretary@burphamca.org.uk phone 01483 567791 or visit the website at www.burphamca.org.uk

Membership of the BCA

At the bottom of this page is our usual request for subscriptions. People often ask why we need the money, so in the September/October issue last year we outlined what we do and how your money is spent – professional costs for advice, subscriptions, hire of venues, expenses incurred by members, funding these updates in Burpham Pages.

The success of the Burpham Support Group, set up to deal with Covid-19, showed that many people were willing to step up and do whatever they could to help. We want to build on this and have been thinking about other ways of supporting the community. In the November/December issue we mentioned that we were exploring community litter-picking, especially in the Local Green Spaces. This has led to ideas about making some of the public areas more attractive, for example by planting bulbs for some spring cheer, or plants that will help pollinators like bees and butterflies.

The success of the Burpham Support Group, set up to deal with Covid-19, showed that many people were willing to step up and do whatever they could to help.

We have also been exploring the possibility of following Merrow’s example and installing a public defibrillator in Burpham. Research shows that a defibrillator is most effective when used within the first few minutes of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) – if used within the first 3 to 5 minutes, the chance of survival increases from 6% to 74%. Cardiac arrest doesn’t just happen to old people – 12 people under the age of 35 die each week from SCA.

There are now thousands of public access defibrillators around the country and we would like to add to the number. Some money may be available from the British Heart Foundation but the BCA would have to do some serious fund raising to pay for one. Although you don’t need any training to use a public defibrillator, we would also like to be able to fund some courses in CPR training.

We have also been exploring the possibility of following Merrow’s example and installing a public defibrillator in Burpham.

Burpham Church at St. Lukes

Help by joining the Burpham Community Association today!

Subscriptions are £8 per household or £4 per single occupancy and run from January to December. Join now or renew your membership for 2020.

You can pay by:

Direct Debit – visit our website at www.burphamca.org.uk which has a link to this system – an email to treasurer@burphamca.org.uk giving your details would be helpful.

Online
Account name: Burpham Community Association
Sort Code: 40-22-26
Account Number: 41049194
To help the Treasurer please identify yourself using initials, surname and the first line of your address.

Please contact Liz Turner, our Membership Secretary, if you have any queries. Her email address is membership@burphamca.org.uk

NB  We never share your data or use it for any purpose other than informing you of BCA activities. 

BCA on Facebook & Twitter!
Join the conversation! Open to members and non-members, it’s a great way to stay up-to-date with everything that’s happening in our community. 
twitter.com/burpham_c_a
facebook.com/burphamCA/

Guildford Community Lottery
A way for everyone to support local causes and be in with a chance to win prizes of up to £25,000. 50% of all tickets sold from our page go to the BCA!

Tickets only cost £1 per week, buy now at www.guildfordlottery.org/support/burpham-community-association

Burpham Gardening Club News

Written by John Boon

January & February 2021

The Club still remains closed at present, hopefully we can open in the Spring when we might have come out of the tiers and life has returned to normal whatever that may be.

I wish you all a successful year in your garden and that you will grow plenty of entries for our shows.

Things to do in the garden in January.

  • If you cannot garden because the soil is rain sodden or frosted you can use your time by studying plant catalogues which have arrived in the post on a regular basis.
  • The same advice applies as when ordering spring flowering bulbs, the larger the plants you buy the better they will be when planted out in May. If you only need a few plants it would probably be better to visit a local nursery, such as Elm Nursery at Sutton Green, in May where you can select your plants first hand.

…remember that this year’s novelty seeds are likely to be next year’s ordinary seeds.

  • New seed varieties which are usually F1 Hybrids are expensive to buy and often difficult to germinate, so look on the back of the packet to see how many seeds you are buying for your money, remember that this year’s novelty seeds are likely to be next year’s ordinary seeds.
  • Whilst the fruit buds are still dormant Apple and Pear trees can be pruned, cut out any congested growth to increase airflow which will improve the quality of next seasons fruit, cut back to a fruit bud which is large and rounded on older growth, one year old shoots should be pruned back to a slender bud.

Things to do in the garden in February.

  • Plunge shrivelled Dahlia tubers into a bucket of tepid water overnight, having removed any rotten tubers, they can then be started into growth to provide cuttings for new plants, place the tubers in a seed tray or pot and lightly cover with damp soil.
  • Slow germinating annuals such as Antirrhinum and Lobelia should be sown indoors.
  • Prune Summer flowering deciduous shrubs such as Buddleia which flower on the current year’s growth. Cut back Summer and Autumn flowering Clematis to the lowest pair of strong buds.
  • Sow Sweet Peas and pot on those sown in the Autumn.
  • When it is mild Broad Beans, Carrots and Parsnips can be sown under cloches.

When it is mild Broad Beans, Carrots and Parsnips can be sown under cloches.

  • Sow Greenhouse Tomatoes, Cucumbers and Peppers at 21°C.
  • Seed Potatoes should be placed on their ends in a light, cool, frost free place to sprout.

To join the club or our meetings Call John Boon on 01483 874123

Grand Opening of Sutherland Memorial Playing Field 1956

Moira McQuaide history of Burpham

Land from Bower’s Farm was given by the Duke of Sutherland in September 1954 to the Mayor, Alderman and Burgesses of the Borough of Guildford as Trustees, “to hold in Trust for the perpetual use as a public recreation and playing field as a War Memorial to the residents of Burpham who were killed on active service during the late war”.

It nearly didn’t happen as The Times reported in 1956 that a petrol station wanted some of the land, but it was decided that the residents had a right to be heard and eventually they won. On Wednesday 27th June 1956 there was a Grand Opening Ceremony, when the Duke of Edinburgh arrived, flying his red helicopter, then got out of the wrong side and completely missed the Guard of Honour waiting to greet him. The Duke unveiled a plaque, planted a tree and talked to many of the children attending the event, before flying off again. In the afternoon there was a Grand Fête, with a fancy dress parade, police dogs, races, bands, sideshows and dancing. A fun day for everyone.

John Saxton was Chairman of the SMPF Management Committee for many years and he kept the spade used by the Duke to plant the tree, apparently a Blue Atlas Cedar, cleaned it up and it has never been used since. Unfortunately it wasn’t engraved, but it is still as good as sparkly new. The football and cricket clubs used the playing field and children used the recreation area. Over the years the playing field was developed and improved, the public area was extended, more trees were planted and more facilities added.

Sadly, it seems that the Duke’s tree was replanted at least four times and it’s not known if it survived. Today there are facilities for football, cricket, bowls and tennis, as well as meeting rooms and a well-equipped children’s playground and lovely green spaces. The car park is well-used, both by parents dropping off children to school or nursery, users of the facilities, or even, on occasion, vans for film crews who are filming nearby. There have also been instances when travellers have parked up on the field, needing to be removed by police. Sutherland Memorial Park received the national Green Flag award in 2005.

In memory of John and Sheila Saxton, keepers of the Duke’s spade for over 60 years.

If you are willing to share your memories and/or photos to tell us more about Burpham then please contact Moira MacQuaide, either by e-mail (moira.macquaide@gmail.com) or by phone or text (07963 756543). My two books (‘The History of Burpham Primary School’ and ‘Burpham – A Gateway to Guildford’) are still available from me for £10 (free delivery locally) or on Amazon.

 

Courage to rebuild!

Have you made any New Year’s resolutions, are you looking forward to putting 2020 behind you and getting on with life as ‘normal’? Perhaps this year it’s going to be a little more challenging than usual.

The New Year is often an opportunity to start fresh and never have we needed that more than after the year of 2020!

What a difficult year, in so many ways, it has been for so many of us! There lies the problem, that most of us are tired and in need of a good rest. Our aim for 2021 might be simply to be able to keep going in our relationships, keep going mentally or keep going financially.

If we can find that elusive thing, ‘courage’, there is an opportunity ahead of us to build something better in 2021 than what we had before.

I don’t know how you feel about heights, but for those who feel a little cautious, imagine a narrow bridge across a deep valley. You need to cross to the other side, but the bridge is long, it’s a very long way down and you do not feel safe! Somehow you need to find the courage to cross over.

If we can find that elusive thing, ‘courage’, there is an opportunity ahead of us to build something better in 2021 than what we had before. One dictionary definition of courage is: strength in the face of pain or grief. So, the first place we discover courage is in acknowledging our own pain and grief for whatever 2020 brought. We need to be willing to face our troubles and realities, however unfair they might seem.

Very few of us can do that on our own, we need help from those who love us or those professionals who understand how to get people through problems. But asking for help can be difficult! Perhaps that’s the thing we most need courage for in 2021.

As a Christian, I live with the knowledge that God promises to be with me at all times, which brings me extraordinary courage to face whatever life brings. Here is one of God’s promises I am holding onto for 2021:

“Be strong. Take courage. Don’t be intimidated. Don’t give them a second thought because God, your God, is striding ahead of you. He’s right there with you. He won’t let you down; he won’t leave you.”

Deuteronomy 31:6

With every blessing
Revs James Levasier
james@burphamchurch.org.uk

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Church office: 01483 825533
www.burphamchurch.org.uk

 

Is it possible to quit smoking and still lose weight? Yes, it is!

Many people associate quitting smoking with weight gain but research shows that gaining weight is not inevitable when you stop smoking.

The study, led by Professor Deborah Lycett from Coventry University’s Centre for Intelligent Healthcare and published in BMJ Open, shows it is even possible with support for quitters to lose weight while they abstain.

As research suggests that both smoking1 and obesity2 are risk factors for developing
severe COVID-19 symptoms and dying from it, there has never been a better time for people to stop smoking and begin managing their weight.

Here are some expert tips to help you successfully overcome some of the common Danger Zones we often associate with giving up smoking – and reach a healthy weight at the same time!

Danger zone 1: Hunger

Nicotine suppresses appetite, and many smokers find they feel hungrier when they stop. This can lead to weight gain because quitters often replace cigarettes with sweets, chocolate or high-fat snacks.

Top tips for when hunger strikes:
  • Satisfying your appetite on low energy dense Free Foods like fruit and vegetables, beans, lentils, pasta, potatoes, rice, eggs, fish, chicken, lean meat, tofu and meat alternatives means you can eat more food for fewer calories. And the really great news is that these are the key ingredients for lots of family favourite meals – from spaghetti bolognese and a Sunday roast to a veggie curry.
  • As well as making sure your meals are super satisfying you can also choose healthy low energy dense snacks that will keep hunger at bay.

When people stop smoking, they often find they enjoy their food much more, as their taste is enhanced!

  • When people stop smoking, they often find they enjoy their food much more, as their taste is enhanced! Try cooking from scratch and treat your freshly awoken taste buds to a host of flavours. You can make a simple pasta sauce with tomatoes, garlic, onion and herbs like basil or rosemary and bulk it out with low energy dense vegetables like carrots, mushrooms and peppers.
  • Another great way to manage your weight and give your health a boost is to get more active. To start with, aim to move more than you normally would – so stand rather than sit, walk rather than drive, dance round the kitchen, do the housework or gardening, wash the car or take the stairs instead of the lift!

Danger zone 2:

Breaking the habit

For many, the act of smoking is an ingrained habit. When people have been smoking for a number of years, it becomes an automatic response to have a cigarette with a morning tea or coffee, after a meal, while taking a break from work or during a regular journey. Often friends, family members and colleagues smoke, and it becomes normal to smoke together, and often a way to socialise.

Top tips for breaking a habit:
  • Think about which moments of your life call for a cigarette, and why. If you’re mindful about spotting these routine habits, you can make effective plans for steering clear of situations where you might have usually smoked, or you can plan to do something else rather than reaching for a cigarette. Do you tend to smoke at the end of a meal? If so, could you replace it with a piece of fresh fruit, or fruit salad and fat-free fromage frais?
  • If breakfast used to be followed by a cigarette, could you do something that will take you away from this, such as leaving the house 10 minutes earlier? You could walk part of your journey instead of driving – which is a great way to increase your activity levels and boost your mood, too!
  • When smokers quit, they often say they miss having something in their hands, and that can lead to them reaching for unhealthy foods. Low energy dense snacks like fruit, vegetable sticks, cherry tomatoes and sugar-free ice lollies mean smokers can indulge their desire to have something in their hands while still making healthy choices.
  • Adding a new meal to your day instead of your usual cigarette ‘meal replacement’ is not a problem with
    Slimming World’s flexible and filling Food Optimising eating plan. Whether it’s a breakfast of eggs and bacon with the fat trimmed off, a jacket potato with tuna for lunch or a delicious  home-made curry, you can satisfy your appetite while losing weight.

Danger zone 3:

Boredom, stress and feeling low

Because of nicotine’s ‘feel-good’ effect on the brain, many smokers may have become accustomed to smoking as a way of coping with feeling bored, tense or fed up. When you have a bad day, it can seem like cigarettes are your only friend.

Top tips for coping with low mood:​
  • Moving more can help you to keep weight off and ease the cravings and irritability associated with nicotine withdrawal, as being active is a fantastic mood-booster. You could start your day with an early morning yoga session or swim. Or, when you get a craving to light up, get into a new habit of standing up and going for a short brisk walk. You’ll soon be brimming with energy and endorphins, which will leave you feeling great all day long.
  • Weight loss is also fantastic for improving mood. With every pound lost, you’ll have so much more energy, confidence and motivation. For every milestone reached, why not reward yourself. The money you’ll save from not buying cigarettes will earn you new clothes or can be spent on day trips, holidays or whatever else takes your fancy. If you put the money you would have spent on a pack of cigarettes to one side, you’ll quickly see it mount up.

Weight loss is also fantastic for improving mood. With every pound lost, you’ll have so much more energy, confidence and motivation.

  • Try cooking healthy, wholesome meals from scratch that the whole family can enjoy – think curries, chilli, pasta dishes, big breakfasts and even burgers! They’ll leave you feeling satisfied and many people find cooking is a great way to relax. Base your meals around things like vegetables, potatoes, lean meat, pasta and beans – foods that are low in calories but super satisfying, not to mention delicious! 

Danger zone 4:

Comfort eating

Overcoming cravings can be the hardest part of giving up smoking and can leave you feeling miserable. That’s exactly when you might turn to emotional eating.

Top tips for managing comfort eating:​
  • If you find yourself turning to food for comfort when you give up smoking, you can combat it by choosing foods that are low in energy density and highly satiating – so that you satisfy your appetite for fewer calories. With Food Optimising, you can make comforting meals like roast dinners, fry-ups, sausage and mash and hot puddings.
  • Instead of reaching for the biscuit tin when cravings come knocking, try distracting yourself by having fun getting active. Take the kids (borrow some if necessary!) out bowling, ice skating or for a kick-around in the park or head out into the garden for some hula-hooping or trampolining. Anything that warms you up, makes you breathe quicker and gets your heart beating faster counts and it’ll improve your health and boost your weight loss, too.
  • Set up strategies, such as working out when your danger times are and developing ‘choice power’ to protect yourself, for example, think to yourself: ‘Instead of having a cigarette, I’m going to stop for a cuppa and read that new magazine, check social media or catch up with a friend. Getting the support of people who understand your challenges and who are also on a journey to better health and wellbeing can also help.

If you find yourself turning to food for comfort when you give up smoking, you can combat it by choosing foods that are low in energy density and highly satiating – so that you satisfy your appetite for fewer calories.

For more support to help you stop smoking, visit the official NHS quit smoking page www.nhs.uk/better-health/quit-smoking/

1 Reddy, R. K., Charles, W. N., Sklavounos, A., Dutt, A., Seed, P. T., & Khajuria, A. (2020). The effect of smoking on COVID‐19 severity: A systematic review and meta‐analysis. Journal of medical virology.
2 Kassir, R. (2020). Risk of COVID‐19 for patients with obesity. Obesity Reviews, 21(6). Dietz, W., & Santos‐Burgoa, C. (2020). Obesity and its Implications for COVID‐19 Mortality.

Make 2021 your year

At Slimming World, we understand the impact these past months have had on our health, our happiness and
our weight. If you’d love to make a fresh start this new year, we’re here to support you all the way to your dream weight. Our real-life groups are open (where local guidance allows) with extra measures to keep you safe and sound. Local groups: Jacobs Well, contact Nicky on 07399 953818; Bellfields & Parkbarn, contact Tony 07999 377811.

How to make your wellness resolutions last beyond January…

By Ian Copp, Personal Trainer

As we turn our backs on the indulgence of the festive period, it’s tempting to go BIG on our plans and goals for January.

Ditching the alcohol, sugar and carbs in favour of healthier alternatives is tempting at the start of the year, but here’s the thing. High motivation will only get you so far, it’s fleeting and will most likely wear off by mid-January, and so the cycle continues.

This year, why not try things a different way – less ‘cold turkey’ and opt instead for a more strategic, informed, planned approach and see how changing small things can make a big difference.

1 Don’t limit yourself to January
The body you want to achieve will not happen in the 31 days of January. You can have a goal for January but make it realistic, and then extend your planning beyond the month. Why not make a plan for the first 6 months of the year – write it down, plan your goals in detail and make yourself accountable
by pinning it somewhere you will see it often.

2 Set yourself achievable goals
What do you want to achieve? Is it weight loss, increased strength, running a marathon or improving your swimming skills?! Try to focus on one thing and break down the components involved. If weight loss is your aim, think about setting weekly targets, planning your meals and scheduling movement into your diary. Prioritise and diarise to keep these habits front of mind.

3 Measure your progress
How do you know how far you have come if you didn’t measure where you started? If you’re hoping for a body-transformation you could take measurements, track weight or even document in photos but track honestly and regularly. And celebrate your wins!

Why not make a plan for the first 6 months of the year – write it down, plan your goals in detail and make yourself accountable by pinning it somewhere you will see it often.

4 Keep the commitment!
Set yourself up for success by keeping your goals achievable. Nothing will knock your confidence more than feeling like you’re failing. By putting realistic expectations on yourself you immediately make success more achievable. 10 minutes of exercise daily is often more realistic than 1 hour Monday-Friday and over time, its consistency that will pay off.

5 Vary your training
If your goals are around fitness, weight loss or body transformations I urge you to vary your movement patterns and challenge yourself in new ways. As a Personal Trainer I often find people get stuck doing the same as they have always done and they wonder why nothing is changing! Vary your training and try your hand at new sports or activities – even better, invest in a PT who will push you out of your comfort zone and help you to create real, meaningful and long lasting changes!

Ian Copp is a personal trainer. He runs a business called The Personal Training Way. www.theptway.co.uk

 

An Act of Remembrance at St Luke’s War Memorial

Sunday 8th November

To attend in person please contact the church office 01483 825533 / office@burphamchurch.org.uk to book your space (please remember to wear a mask). As there will be limited space, this will also be streamed, so do join online via Burpham Church YouTube Channel.

Website:

www.burphamchurch.org.uk
YouTube Channel

Venue:

Time:

10.45-11.05am

Messy Church at the Church of the Holy Spirit

Fortnightly on Sundays 4.00pm
November 1st, 15th, 29th

An opportunity for families with under 11s to join for craft, bible story, activities and music for 45mins. Booking essential, contact nicky@burphamchurch.org.uk

Website:

www.burphamchurch.org.uk

Venue:

Time:

4.00pm